Social Enterprise

A Commercial Intervention

Jeffrey Hollender
Corporate Responsibility Magazine

Human Technologies Corporation

Human Technologies Corporation (HTC) is a nonprofit company made up of six diverse businesses including sewing, maintenance services, and supply chain logistics whose combine revenue exceeds $18 million.  The corporation offers training, support services, and employment for individuals with disabilities and other hard to employ community members.

Aspen Pointe

With revenues exceeding $48 million dollars, Aspen Pointe is the largest nonprofit in Colorado Springs, comprised of 12 organizations that serve more than 30,000 individuals and families each year through employment and career development, education services, and housing programs. The coalition also functions as a social enterprise, offering five business services and enterprises that train and employ disadvantaged residents, at-risk youth, and veterans. Read more about Aspen Pointe...

Reimagining Service

Reimagining Service is a national, multi-sector network working to increase social impact through effective volunteer engagement.  The website offers nonprofits and for-profit businesses comprehensive research, resources, and case studies on the service enterprise model, which leverages volunteers and their skills to help promote social missions.

The Truth about Ben and Jerry’s

Anthony Page and Robert A. Katz
Stanford Social Innovation Review

Aspen Pointe

With revenues exceeding $48 million dollars, Aspen Pointe is the largest nonprofit in Colorado Springs, comprised of 12 organizations that serve more than 30,000 individuals and families each year through employment and career development, education services, and housing programs. The coalition also functions as a social enterprise, offering five business services and enterprises that train and employ disadvantaged residents, at-risk youth, and veterans.

The Harvest Kitchen Project

The Harvest Kitchen Project is an extension of Farm Fresh Rhode Island, a not-for-profit local food system, that provides a 15-week culinary and job-readiness training curriculum for youth within the Division of Juvenile Corrections.  Participants are trained in preparation of high-quality preserved foods using ingredients grown by local farmers.  Final products are sold at local stores, farmers markets, and to wholesale customers, targeting bulk quantities for local schools, hospitals, and cafeterias. Read more about The Harvest Kitchen Project...

Beautiful Day

Beautiful Day builds onramps to employment and economic self-sufficiency for refugees through business innovation. By aligning a need for job-training with consumer demand for socially conscious products, we are developing practical, efficient, community-oriented ways to integrate and welcome refugees to our society.
 

To date we’ve worked with over 80 refugees, representing 14 nationalities and 20 ethnicities, including many with no first-language literacy. We offer training at multiple levels, though our priority is those facing the biggest job-entry barriers. Almost all of our employee-trainer staff were once refugees who understand the journey our trainees are on. Over 80% of our training participants go on to permanent jobs while providing for their families, contributing to our economy, and enriching our community with their determination and resilience.

 
Beautiful Day is considered one of the premier producers of granola and granola bars  in Rhode Island, with a growing number of customers in 50 out of 54 states. Our products can be purchased online at www.beautifuldayri.org and a growing number of the retail location in Rhode Island and Massachusetts. 
 


Amos House

The Amos House has experienced tremendous growth since its inception in 1976, with a staff of 50 people, the house is one of the leading social service agency in Rhode Island, managing the largest soup kitchen, providing services to over 15,000 individuals a year, and housing nearly 150 men and women a night.  Amos House Works is the business sector of the organization, with over 20 full-and-part time employees that work in their for-profit businesses: More than A Meal Catering, Amos House Builds, Friendship Café, and Bristol Harbor’s Homemade.  They have also graduated over 400 adults from their on-the-job training programs: Amos Culinary Education, Amos Carpentry Training, and Literacy Training.  The coalition's transitional housing program and phase two housing programs have assisted 2,300 individuals transition from homeless to self-sufficiency.

In Search of the Hybrid Ideal

Julie Battilana, Matthew Lee, John Walker and Cheryl Dorsey
Stanford Social Innovation Review

This Stanford Social Innovation Review article explores businesses that more fully incorporate a for-profit component to fund a social mission than traditional nonprofit social enterprises.  A primary challenge to the hybrid model is the constant tension between mission and market, where the search for more profitable markets may ultimately crowd out the very people the organization is attempting to serve.  However, other challenges – and opportunities – exist. This hybrid model has gained increasing notice in the wake of the 2008 financial crisis. To date, sector growth has been modest. Nonetheless, Echoing Green, a nonprofit that supports early stage social business development, reports 50 percent of their 3,500 applicants now rely on this hybrid model, up from just 37 percent in 2006.